A Farewell Sermon by Jonathan Edwards


Jonathan Edwards was voted out of his congregation in Northampton, Massachusetts, on June 22, 1750, because of his belief that the Lord's Super was not for the unconverted. A Farewell Sermon was preached on July 1, 1750 and addressed of how a pastor cares for his congregation, and how he will meet with them again in heaven at the Judgment when all truth will be known. Jonathan Edwards gives advice and warning to the congregation. He eventually moved to work among the Housatonic Indians at Stockbridge, Massachusetts.
Jonathan Edwards (1703–1758) was born in East Windsor, Connecticut. His father, Timothy Edwards, was the minister at East Windsor. Jonathan attended Yale to receive his B.A. and M.A. degrees. In 1727, he was ordained and became an assistant pastor with his grandfather, Rev. Solomon Stoddard, at the church in Northampton, Massachusetts. The same year he married Sarah Pierpont with whom he raised a large family. He became active in revivals and is said to be a stimulator of the "Great Awakening" along with George Whitefield. He became president of the College of New Jersey (Princeton) in 1758.
    

The Force of Truth: An Authentic Narrative by Thomas Scott

The Force of Truth is an autobiographical account of how Rev. Thomas Scott came to his evangelical convictions. Initially, he became ordained in the Church of England, but was wholly self-centered and unspiritual. When he tried to argue with John Newton about doctrine, the two began to interchange letters, but then stopped. Thomas Scott set out on a course of self-study which led to a conviction of his own sin with the realization that he needed God’s grace. This edition contains eight letters from John Newton historically connected to the early period and reveal much of how Newton viewed the process of the revelation of God to sinners. A recommendatory letter was written by Rev. Samuel Miller for extended circulation in the United States, and also the inclusion of John Newton’s name where it had been left out in previous editions. The writing style and arrangement were overseen by William Cowper of Olney, before it was published in 1779. 
Thomas Scott (1747–1821) was born in Lincolnshire, England. He worked on his father's farm but he also studied Greek and Latin. In 1772, he sought to be ordained and he became the curate of Stoke Goldington and Weston Underwood. After studying many books he was convicted of his own sin and he embraced Calvinist doctrine. Thomas Scott took over the Olney pulpit in 1781. In 1785, he became the Lecturer of Lock Hospital in London, where he was a favorite preacher of William Wilberforce, Henry Thornton, and Hannah More. In 1803, he moved to Aston Sandford, Buckinghamshire. He is known for founding the Lock Asylum, the Church Missionary Society and his Commentary for the "Family Bible."

Illustrative Notes on the Pilgrim's Progress by Thomas Scott

The illustrative notes of Rev. Thomas Scott were compiled from the footnotes of an edition of "The Pilgrim's Progress" published by John B. Perry in 1855. The notes of that two-part edition have been divided into chapters for easier reference. Each note is introduced with its anchor phrase from the text of the story. This edition also includes Thomas Scott's Preface and Life of John Bunyan. "The Pilgrim's Progress" was one of Scott's favorite books and his extensive notes are sure to help anyone understand the symbolism and nuances of the allegory.
[Thomas Scott's aim is] ". . . fixing the precise meaning of those parts, which might most perplex the inquirer, and which seem to have most escaped notice, or divided the sentiments, of expositors; [and] to state and establish, compendiously but clearly, those doctrinal, practical, and experimental views of Christianity, which Mr. Bunyan meant to convey."
Thomas Scott (1747–1821) was born in Lincolnshire, England. He worked on his father's farm but he also studied Greek and Latin. In 1772, he sought to be ordained and he became the curate of Stoke Goldington and Weston Underwood. After studying many books he was convicted of his own sin and he embraced Calvinist doctrine. Thomas Scott took over the Olney pulpit in 1781. In 1785, he became the Lecturer of Lock Hospital in London, where he was a favorite preacher of William Wilberforce, Henry Thornton, and Hannah More. In 1803, he moved to Aston Sandford, Buckinghamshire. He is known for founding the Lock Asylum, the Church Missionary Society and his Commentary for the "Family Bible."

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Archies Old Desk by Sarah Doudney

Archie inherited an old desk from his sailor uncle, and moved to London. He decided he liked a fast lifestyle and had contempt for his more disciplined roommate Martin Willis. He befriended Arnold Huntlie and had many unhealthy late night adventures. Archie stole from Martin, to cover his debts, and during a scuffle, the secret of Archie's desk was revealed. Published in 1872, this is one of Sarah Doudney's early popular stories. This edition has five illustrations.
SARAH DOUDNEY (1841-1926) was born in Portsmouth, England. Her family was in the candle business. She grew up in rural areas and went to Madame Dowell's College. She wrote, starting from an early age, numerous novels, poetry, hymns and stories. She wrote the hymn, "Sleep on Beloved," sung at Charles Spurgeon's funeral.
    
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Practical Thoughts by William Nevins

These forty-six devotional newspaper articles were published in 1834 and 1835. The focus is on practical outward expressions of the Christian faith. Topics covered include prayer, generosity, enjoyment of religion, and heaven.
     The Introduction from the book is as follows: "The following pages consist of miscellaneous articles published by the lamented author within the year 1834, and the months of January and February, 1835, chiefly in the New York Observer, with the signature 'M. S.,' the finals of his name. They were written after the insidious disease by which God was pleased to transplant him to a higher sphere of labor had so affected his voice as in a great degree to disable him from his stated public ministrations. This discipline was evidently blessed in his rapid sanctification, his obtaining uncommonly clear views of truth and duty, and his ardent desire to do something to rouse Christians to greater attainments in personal holiness, and through their efforts and prayers to bless the world. His mind acted with unwonted vigor; he panted to speak to multitudes for God and eternity, and adopted the only means then remaining to him—his pen. When about two-thirds of the articles were written, he was called suddenly to part with his beloved wife; and the hallowed influence of the affliction is most apparent in the subsequent articles, the last of which, 'Heaven's Attractions,' with the additional fragment, seemed almost prophetic of the event which was soon to follow."
WILLIAM NEVINS 1797-1835) was born in Norwich, Connecticut. He attended Yale and then Princeton Theological Seminary. In 1820, he became an ordained minister and the pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in Baltimore, Maryland. In 1822, he married Mary Lloyd Key (1801–1834), cousin of Francis Scott Key, and had five children.

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Probable Sons by Amy Le Feuvre

The Parable of the Prodigal Son is illustrated several times in this allegorical children's story. Little Milly's innocent understanding of the Bible became the simple wisdom that was needed by the adults around her. The "Probable Son" as she calls it, is the substance of her hopes and her prayers throughout the story. "I tell you the truth, anyone who will not receive the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it."—John 10:15.
Amy Le Feuvre (1861-1929) was born in Blackheath, London, England. She grew up in a large family. Her father worked as a Surveyor at H. M. Customs - CSO. She wrote many books, stories and for magazines like Sunday at Home and Quiver.

The Young Cottager by Legh Richmond

Jane Squibb, a twelve year old, attended Saturday afternoon instruction at Rev. Legh Richmond’s house. He used the graves in the churchyard and the beauty of nature to teach the children about God. Jane was little noticed until she became sick, then Rev. Richmond decided to visit her constantly. Little Jane’s spiritual maturity exhibited an affectionate seriousness and a knowledge of the Scriptures. “He not only called her as a child to show, by a similitude, what conversion means, but he also called her by his grace to be a vessel of mercy, and a living witness of that almighty power and love by which her own heart was turned to God.”—Legh Richmond. This extended edition includes rich scenery descriptions and three illustrations. The appendix includes reports of two visits to the Isle of Wight years afterward.  
LEGH RICHMOND (1772–1827) was born in Liverpool, England. He attended Trinity College in Cambridge and received his B.A. and M.A. degrees. The young clergyman entered the ministry at the Isle of Wight. When he read "Wilberforce’s Practical View of Christianity," he had a spiritual awakening, and respectfully named his son Wilberforce. On the Isle of Wight he met ‘The Dairyman’s Daughter,’ ‘The African Servant’ and ‘Little Jane.’ After seven years he moved to London and then to Turvey, where he wrote "The Fathers of the English Church."

Memoir of Harriet Ware by Francis Wayland

Harriet Ware (1799–1847) was born in Paxton, Massachusetts. She was a school teacher in Maine and Rhode Island. She had a selfless, passionate love of orphans and began a school for destitute children on India Point in Providence, Rhode Island. Although people had advised her to give up, she was determined to do the impossible. Francis Wayland helped her to found the Providence Children's Friend Society, a place for suffering children that needed help and provision. This edition contains letters of Harriet Ware with explanatory remarks by Francis Wayland.
"How was it that a young woman, almost wholly unknown, and wholly destitute of means, should have been enabled to accomplish so great an amount of good? I think the answer is obvious. She acted on principles peculiar to the gospel of Christ. She was, in the first place, sincerely and earnestly desirous to do good; and, to accomplish this purpose, was willing to make any personal sacrifice. In the next place, she puts this desire into practice, by engaging in the first benevolent labor that was placed before her. She did not wait until something precisely in harmony with her intellectual tastes or social affections should present itself, but undertook the first work that her Master placed before her."—Francis Wayland.
Francis Wayland (1796–1865) was born in New York City, New York. He attended Union College and Andover Theological Seminary. He became a minister at the First Baptist Church in Boston. He was professor at Union College for a short time, and then became President of Brown Theological Seminary (1827-1855). After 1855, he was a minister of First Baptist Church in Rhode Island. He was known for his textbooks on the topics of Moral Science and Political Economy.

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The Work of Jesus Christ As an Advocate by John Bunyan

There is great relief and comfort to Christians that have sinned, to contemplate the office of Jesus Christ as an Advocate. John Bunyan says: "God's people are baffled with the devil for want of a distinct knowledge of Christ in all his offices." He presents a courtroom drama of Christians who have sinned, against Satan who is making accusations before the Father. He explores the where, how, what, when, with whom, and for whom in this exposition of 1 John 2:1; "And if any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous." This edition is the George Offor text which includes his introduction and footnotes.
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John Bunyan (1628-1688) was born in Harrowden, Elstow, England. Early he was a tinker who followed in his father's occupation. He had years of vain pleasures followed by law abiding religiosity. After he struggled in his thinking, Bunyan became a true Christian and was baptized in 1653. His natural gift for preaching became evident, and his ordination was by popular demand. His conviction to preach was at whatever the cost and in 1660 he was imprisoned for 12 years for preaching without a license. He is a favorite among the Puritans and was an ambitious writer with over 60 works to his name, including the famous "The Pilgrim's Progress."

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Soul Idolatry Excludes Men Out of Heaven by David Clarkson

Learn to recognize the subtle ways that a person's inner life bows down to various false gods. David Clarkson details a list of everyday idols and the worship of them that one can use to detect soul idolatry in their lives. His call is that God is very serious about idols and Christians should be serious as well. This edition is the complete sermon as published by James Nichol in 1864.
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DAVID CLARKSON (1622-1686) was born in Yorkshire, England. He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge. He married Miss Holcroft in 1651. He served as rector of Crayford, Kent; Mortlake, Surrey; and with John Owen in Leadenhall Street, London.

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